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He initially served as a company sergeant under the command of his brother, Capt. John P. For the next five years, McCrory seemed to be in action at practically every major battle of the revolution. The next year he saw action in the American defeat at the battle of Stono Ferry near Charleston on June 20, One thousand American soldiers were taken prisoner at Camden. McCrory eventually was captured by Lt. McCrory hardly could have picked a worse fate than to be captured by Tarleton, who had earned infamy at the Battle of Waxhaws when American Col.

Abraham Buford surrendered his forces to him. The sordid affair came to be known as the Waxhaws Massacre and provided strong anti-British propaganda for the colonials. With each passing month his Irish blood boiled. One night he jumped overboard and miraculously swam through the icy waters to shore. He was honorably discharged in the spring of , ending his military career.

Patriot's POV fighting in the Revolutionary War OSV

He stayed there until sometime around , when he moved his family which had grown to twelve children to Alabama. In McCrory started buying land in Alabama, and over the next ten years he purchased a total of acres near the town of Vienna in what is now Pickens County. Settled in the s, the town was established on the east side of the Tombigbee River as a river port and trading center. McCrory lived with his son Robert in Pickens County, and on June 13, , he was granted a military pension based on his Revolutionary War service.

Items left at grave side must be floral in nature and may not stand taller than the headstone. Floral items and other decorations may not be secured to the headstone.

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Flowers will be removed when spent, for mowing and maintenance, or if damaged by weather or wildlife. No permanent floral vases are permitted. Due to the open nature of the grounds, we cannot guarantee against theft, vandalism or the effects of nature. Plantings will not be permitted on graves at any time.

World War II and Alabama | Encyclopedia of Alabama

Potted plants will be permitted on graves during the period 10 days before and 10 days after Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day and Christmas. Christmas wreaths or grave blankets are permitted on graves from December 15 through January 10 and will be removed not later than January 20 of each year.

Grave floral blankets may not be larger than two by three feet. Permanent plantings, statues, vigil lights, breakable objects and similar items are not permitted on the graves. Hazardous materials, glass, metal, toys, candles, balloons and flags are not permitted. The Department of Veterans Affairs does not permit adornments which are considered offensive, inconsistent with the dignity of the cemetery or considered hazardous to cemetery personnel.

For example, items incorporating beads or wires may become entangled in mowers or other equipment and cause injury. Unauthorized items will be removed immediately. The cemetery does not keep any unauthorized decorations once they have been removed from the grave. In order to preserve the dignity and honor of our Veteran's final resting place, please observe the following rules of behavior while visiting the cemetery grounds:. Altering a headstone in any manner is prohibited. VA regulations 38 CFR 1. Possession of firearms on any property under the charge and control of VA is prohibited.

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Offenders may be subject to a fine, removal from the premises, or arrest. With the passage of the National Cemetery Expansion Act of , Congress directed the Department of Veterans Affairs to establish six new national cemeteries in areas with at least , residents not currently served by burial locations for veterans, including central Alabama. Alabama National Cemetery was formally dedicated in , and opened for burials the following year.

Alabama National Cemetery is the third national cemetery built in the state and the th in the national cemetery system. The first burials commenced on June 25, In , Alabama National Cemetery completed construction of the cemetery support facilities including the Public Information Center, main entrance with Avenue of Flags, memorial wall with flag circle, offices and maintenance facilities, columbarium, committal shelters, and memorial walkway.

The design and layout received an honor award from the Alabama Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Prior to development and use as a national cemetery, the land had a long and culturally-varied history. During the Colonial period the Muskogee tribe, also known as the Creeks, lived in central Alabama. By the early 19th century, European-American encroachment led to a division within the Creek society between a partially-assimilated faction, and those that sought to return to their traditional culture and religion.

Tensions culminated in the Creek War — which began as a tribal civil war but became intertwined with the War of when the U. Four years after taking control of the territory the Alabama Territorial General Assembly created Shelby County from some of the former Creek Indian territory on February 7, Alabama became a state one year later in Abundant iron and coal deposits are found throughout Shelby County.

As early as the s, settlers began to establish small-scale forges to smith iron ore.

There were many Revolutionary War soldiers in Alabama – here are biographies of a few

Production gradually increased in the coming decades, and during the Civil War local iron works produced war materiel for the Confederacy. By the early 20th century, labor-intensive cotton production gave way to a more diversified set of crops; corn, wheat, peanuts, and soybeans were typical. The population of Shelby County began to grow steadily in the s, as new housing developments were constructed for workers commuting into Birmingham, the largest city in the state.

The rabid population growth included veterans, which led to a need for the national cemetery. For example, Monmouth was one of the most populous battles and yet killed and wounded were far less than other battles fought with less combatants 2. There are as many explanations as to why a battle was casualty-laden as there are battles.


  1. The Routledge Handbook of International Crime and Justice Studies (Routledge International Handbooks).
  2. Alabama Military Records?
  3. World War II and Alabama.

Whether rates are more important than gross casualty figures is debatable but for the unlucky combatant, his battle was the most dangerous. Thanks, SPM.

As you said, despite all the caveats, this information—presented collectively—is eyebrow raising and great food for thought. Good call, Pinja. This list, however, is based solely on Americans killed and wounded. The numbers always astonish me. Casualty rates are another statistic that can unfortunately be manipulated to achieve some objective. However, Mr. Andrlik has presented them here without prejudice. That the North American continent as a whole had its fate determined over centuries by relatively so few in number amazes me from my 20thst century perspective. Your email address will not be published.

Xavier della Gatta's Battle of Paoli painting Source: American Revolution Center Collection.


  1. Alabama Military Records.
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